Venous Thrombosis: The Importance of Early Detection

Woman feeling chest painDeep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a commonly misdiagnosed life-threatening disease that often affects adults. It affects one in 1000 individuals in the United States, but by the time it is detected, serious damage has already occurred in the leg tissues.

Thus, it is vital to visit a vascular specialist at the earliest signs of DVT.

Role of Early DVT Diagnosis

Venous thrombosis may cause permanent cell death in your leg tissues. Due to prolonged absence of blood supply, your leg tissues do not receive sufficient oxygen for cellular processes. Furthermore, if blood cannot bypass the obstruction and flow freely, fluids tend to accumulate in the lower leg and foot.

Thus, patients with beginning signs of DVT may experience unilateral leg pain, heaviness, and swelling. If blood vessel occlusion persists, you will need to undergo surgical venous stents placement to prevent progressive tissue deterioration.

D-Dimer Testing

If your physician suspects the possibility of venous thrombosis, you need to undergo several blood examinations to confirm the diagnosis. They usually administer the D-dimer test to detect the presence of loose blood clots in the circulation.

A D-dimer elevation is indicative that you have increased blood clots in your veins. However, you need a further workup to visualize if a blockage is present specifically in your leg vessels.

Lower Extremity Ultrasound

Ultrasound of the leg is an important imaging test to observe if a blood clot impedes the flow of blood in your lower extremity. You can visualize plaque formation in major vessels of the legs such as femoral, popliteal, and iliac veins.

Aside from traditional ultrasound, Doppler sonography may also be performed to check for the severity of flow disturbance caused by the clot. It serves as a diagnostic modality to quantify objectively the degree of vessel constriction as well as the gravity of the disease.

The tissues in the leg are highly dependent on fuel for metabolism and energy production. Thus, progressive vessel occlusion in your legs may cause irreversible tissue damage if left untreated.

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Posted on by Nihonmagazine in Wellness Zone

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